Excerpt from JCYC Up Close Winter 2017 The College Access Programs of JCYC started in 1979 with an initial TRIO grant funded by the US Department of Education. The federal TRIO grant program was established in 1965 in response to the civil rights era, War on Poverty, and a national need to increase educational opportunity and attainment. What was initially established as the Asian American Communities for Education (AACE) Talent Search program has blossomed into the JCYC College Access Programs with three distinct programs which serve 13 school sites. The College Access Programs offer free educational assistance and college advising to over 3,000 students in San Francisco and Daly City. Services include academic tutoring, study skills, high school selection counseling, and career counseling at the middle school level, and college entrance exam prep, college admission application assistance, and financial aid assistance at the high school level. In 2016, JCYC competed with college universities and other non-profits throughout the country to renew the organization’s TRIO grants and seek an expansion of services. In August, JCYC not only successfully renewed the two existing grants, but was also one of the few organizations in the country to be awarded a new grant. The newest grant will expand services to 500 more San Francisco Unified School District students in the Southeast sector of the city by targeting Phillip and Sala Burton high school and Martin Luther King Jr. Academic middle school. Our newest educational advisor for Phillip and Sala Burton high school (Burton), Charles Watkins, is a recent Cal State University East Bay grad with experience working with diverse students in low income communities. He is excited about the new grant specifically targeting the Visitacion Valley area, where he can identify with youth who feel unmotivated and unsupported. Charles has set the new school year ablaze with a field trip for the entire 11th grade class—consisting of 270 students. He hopes that this will start to build a college culture well before their Senior year. He explains, “it is our duty to inform students about the variety of postsecondary options. The overall goal is to make sure students have a plan once they leave Burton, and hopefully the end goal is reaching for a college degree.” Just down the street from Phillip and Sala Burton high school, is Martin Luther King Jr. Academic middle school (MLK). Arleen Garcia, who is a veteran JCYC educational advisor, is excited about the opportunities that will be possible through the new grant. She explains, “MLK Middle School does not have all of the resources that other schools in SFUSD are fortunate enough to have. ETS helps provide the students with field trips, presentations, and extra academic support, for free.” Arleen grew up in the Bayview district and is extremely familiar with some of the challenges of the neighborhood where her students live. She explains, I want them to know that they have adults who are here to support them and want them to succeed in life. Arleen Garcia works at MLK on Monday-Thursday from 8:30-5:00PM. She can be reached at agarcia@jcyc.org. Charles Watkins works at Burton on Monday-Thursday from 9:00-5:00 PM. He can be reached at cwatkins@jcyc.org. If you have questions about ETS, please contact Associate Directors Tyla Brown, tbrown@jcyc.org, or Gina Gutierrez, ggutierrez@jcyc.org. To download a complete version of JCYC Up Close Winter 2017, click here.

JCYC Educational Talent Search Expands

Their Reach

NAVIGATION
JCYC’S SOCIAL MEDIA
ADDRESS 2012 Pine Street San Francisco, CA 94115
CONTACT info@jcyc.org Tel:  (415) 202-7900 Fax: (415) 921-1841
Arleen Garcia with middle school graduates
Charles Watkins, educational advisor at Burton High School
NAVIGATION
JCYC’S SOCIAL MEDIA
ADDRESS 2012 Pine Street San Francisco, CA 94115
CONTACT info@jcyc.org Tel:  (415) 202-7900 Fax: (415) 921-1841

JCYC Educational Talent

Search Expands Their

Reach

Excerpt from JCYC Up Close Winter 2017 The College Access Programs of JCYC started in 1979 with an initial TRIO grant funded by the US Department of Education. The federal TRIO grant program was established in 1965 in response to the civil rights era, War on Poverty, and a national need to increase educational opportunity and attainment. What was initially established as the Asian American Communities for Education (AACE) Talent Search program has blossomed into the JCYC College Access Programs with three distinct programs which serve 13 school sites. The College Access Programs offer free educational assistance and college advising to over 3,000 students in San Francisco and Daly City. Services include academic tutoring, study skills, high school selection counseling, and career counseling at the middle school level, and college entrance exam prep, college admission application assistance, and financial aid assistance at the high school level. In 2016, JCYC competed with college universities and other non-profits throughout the country to renew the organization’s TRIO grants and seek an expansion of services. In August, JCYC not only successfully renewed the two existing grants, but was also one of the few organizations in the country to be awarded a new grant. The newest grant will expand services to 500 more San Francisco Unified School District students in the Southeast sector of the city by targeting Phillip and Sala Burton high school and Martin Luther King Jr. Academic middle school. Our newest educational advisor for Phillip and Sala Burton high school (Burton), Charles Watkins, is a recent Cal State University East Bay grad with experience working with diverse students in low income communities. He is excited about the new grant specifically targeting the Visitacion Valley area, where he can identify with youth who feel unmotivated and unsupported. Charles has set the new school year ablaze with a field trip for the entire 11th grade class—consisting of 270 students. He hopes that this will start to build a college culture well before their Senior year. He explains, “it is our duty to inform students about the variety of postsecondary options. The overall goal is to make sure students have a plan once they leave Burton, and hopefully the end goal is reaching for a college degree.” Just down the street from Phillip and Sala Burton high school, is Martin Luther King Jr. Academic middle school (MLK). Arleen Garcia, who is a veteran JCYC educational advisor, is excited about the opportunities that will be possible through the new grant. She explains, “MLK Middle School does not have all of the resources that other schools in SFUSD are fortunate enough to have. ETS helps provide the students with field trips, presentations, and extra academic support, for free.” Arleen grew up in the Bayview district and is extremely familiar with some of the challenges of the neighborhood where her students live. She explains, I want them to know that they have adults who are here to support them and want them to succeed in life. Arleen Garcia works at MLK on Monday-Thursday from 8:30- 5:00PM. She can be reached at agarcia@jcyc.org. Charles Watkins works at Burton on Monday-Thursday from 9:00-5:00 PM. He can be reached at cwatkins@jcyc.org. If you have questions about ETS, please contact Associate Directors Tyla Brown, tbrown@jcyc.org, or Gina Gutierrez, ggutierrez@jcyc.org. To download a complete version of JCYC Up Close Winter 2017, click here.
Arleen Garcia with middle school graduates
Charles Watkins, educational advisor at Burton High School