This question has been raised many times since our Presidential Election.  How do we explain the unconscionable behavior of our new President?  How do we tell a child that many of his inexcusable comments and views were completely ignored by millions in this country?  How do we rationalize the hate, intolerance, and fear that some now feel emboldened to make tragically prevalent in our society. We can start by telling our children that when they face challenges and struggles in their life, it is important that we do not simply blame others.  It is easy to say that this group or that group is the reason why it is difficult to find a job, or feed your family, or pay your rent.  But while it is convenient to case blame, our children should be told that every group in this country deserves to be treated with respect and dignity.  We must tell them that a compassionate and kind heart will always lead us in the right direction. We must also tell our children that we are a land of immigrants.  Our country was built on immigrants who traveled here by any means necessary to seek out a better life.  To now say, that some should not be welcome flies in the face of the very foundation of America.  We must share with our children the inscription on the Statue of Liberty which reads, “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.”  We must explain to our children that this is the true spirit of this country and we must never forget that. We should reiterate to our children that our diversity is one of the many attributes that makes this country great.  America is a beautiful blend of cultures, religions, and lifestyles.  Our differences should be celebrated and cherished and never be used to divide us.  We must continue to impress upon our children JCYC’s belief that, “We must respect and embrace the differences that make all members of our society unique.”  It is imperative that we remind our children that decisions are made by those who show up.  We may not always like our choices, but sometimes in this country we have to make hard decisions.  It can be difficult and unsatisfying, but in the end, we must all take a stand and participate in our democracy.  When we choose to sit out, we let others make decisions for us.  We must never let our children forget that they will one day be our leaders and they have it within themselves to build an army of hope. We must demonstrate to our children that humanity and empathy are values which are vital for a just and free society.  Where we come from, our religious beliefs, and our ethnicity should never be used to generalize and make assumptions about an entire group of people.  We must speak out against ignorance and remind this country that this election did not grant permission to disrespect or make anyone the target of hate.  In times like today, we should explain to our children that America isn’t perfect.  Democracy is hard and there are times when our country loses its way.  Though we’d like to have faith in our leaders and view them as role models, it is far more important for each of us to choose to do what is right and never lose sight of how we should treat one another.   And we must tell our children to be resilient and to never give up.  We will need them to make amends for the mistakes of those who have come before them and to never forget or repeat our errors of the past.  There will always be those who insist that some are less than or unequal to others.  But no matter the color of their skin, who they pray to, or what customs they practice, each of us is special.  We can never let our children forget that they are unique and powerful and beautiful and can one day lead this country the way it should be. Sincerely, Jon Osaki Executive Director

What Do We Tell Our Children?

NAVIGATION
JCYC’S SOCIAL MEDIA
ADDRESS 2012 Pine Street San Francisco, CA 94115
CONTACT info@jcyc.org Tel:  (415) 202-7900 Fax: (415) 346-1948
NAVIGATION
JCYC’S SOCIAL MEDIA
ADDRESS 2012 Pine Street San Francisco, CA 94115
CONTACT info@jcyc.org Tel:  (415) 202-7900 Fax: (415) 921-1841

What Do We Tell Our

Children?

This question has been raised many times since our Presidential Election.  How do we explain the unconscionable behavior of our new President?  How do we tell a child that many of his inexcusable comments and views were completely ignored by millions in this country?  How do we rationalize the hate, intolerance, and fear that some now feel emboldened to make tragically prevalent in our society. We can start by telling our children that when they face challenges and struggles in their life, it is important that we do not simply blame others.  It is easy to say that this group or that group is the reason why it is difficult to find a job, or feed your family, or pay your rent.  But while it is convenient to case blame, our children should be told that every group in this country deserves to be treated with respect and dignity.  We must tell them that a compassionate and kind heart will always lead us in the right direction. We must also tell our children that we are a land of immigrants.  Our country was built on immigrants who traveled here by any means necessary to seek out a better life.  To now say, that some should not be welcome flies in the face of the very foundation of America.  We must share with our children the inscription on the Statue of Liberty which reads, “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.”  We must explain to our children that this is the true spirit of this country and we must never forget that. We should reiterate to our children that our diversity is one of the many attributes that makes this country great.  America is a beautiful blend of cultures, religions, and lifestyles.  Our differences should be celebrated and cherished and never be used to divide us.  We must continue to impress upon our children JCYC’s belief that, “We must respect and embrace the differences that make all members of our society unique.”  It is imperative that we remind our children that decisions are made by those who show up.  We may not always like our choices, but sometimes in this country we have to make hard decisions.  It can be difficult and unsatisfying, but in the end, we must all take a stand and participate in our democracy.  When we choose to sit out, we let others make decisions for us.  We must never let our children forget that they will one day be our leaders and they have it within themselves to build an army of hope. We must demonstrate to our children that humanity and empathy are values which are vital for a just and free society.  Where we come from, our religious beliefs, and our ethnicity should never be used to generalize and make assumptions about an entire group of people.  We must speak out against ignorance and remind this country that this election did not grant permission to disrespect or make anyone the target of hate.  In times like today, we should explain to our children that America isn’t perfect.  Democracy is hard and there are times when our country loses its way.  Though we’d like to have faith in our leaders and view them as role models, it is far more important for each of us to choose to do what is right and never lose sight of how we should treat one another.   And we must tell our children to be resilient and to never give up.  We will need them to make amends for the mistakes of those who have come before them and to never forget or repeat our errors of the past.  There will always be those who insist that some are less than or unequal to others.  But no matter the color of their skin, who they pray to, or what customs they practice, each of us is special.  We can never let our children forget that they are unique and powerful and beautiful and can one day lead this country the way it should be. Sincerely, Jon Osaki Executive Director