Excerpt from JCYC Up Close Winter 2020 Happy New Year! As some of you know, I am not only a long-time staff member of JCYC, but also participated in the organization’s programs as a child. I have many fond memories of my summers in JCYC’s Daycamp program. However, after all these years, one of the activities still stands out among the rest. It was during a summer at JCYC that I first learned the story of Sadako Sasaki. For those who do not know her story, Sadako was a child living in Hiroshima, Japan when the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the city in 1945. Though Sadako initially survived, she eventually developed leukemia from the radiation exposure. As her sickness grew worse, she learned of a Japanese legend, which promised that anyone who folds a thousand cranes (tsuru) will be granted happiness and good health. In the hopes that this legend would help her overcome the leukemia, Sadako began folding cranes. Though she was successful in folding over a thousand cranes, she eventually succumbed to her illness and passed away at the age of 12. Though this story did not have a happy ending, soon after Sadako’s death, her friends and family began raising money for a memorial. Today, a statue of Sadako stands on the top of the Children’s World Peace Monument in Hiroshima and remains one of the most enduring international symbols of peace and goodwill. Each summer when I was a kid in JCYC’s Daycamp program, we were told this story and would fold 1,000 paper cranes to remind ourselves of the importance of world peace. Today, the paper crane is once again being used to symbolize hope. In this instance, the tsuru is being used to demonstrate compassion, hope and healing to migrant children and families who are currently being incarcerated by the United States. This effort was started by a small band of activists, who call themselves Tsuru for Solidarity. Their initial plan was to collect paper cranes and bring them to the migrant detention center in Dilley, Texas. After putting out a call for 10,000 paper cranes, they ended up receiving over 25,000. They hung the cranes on the fences of the detention center in the hopes that the children being incarcerated would know that there are many who wish to express compassion for these innocent young souls. In June of 2020, Tsuru for Solidarity and advocacy groups from around the country will descend upon Washington, D.C. to protest the incarceration of migrant children and families and demand the closure of the detention centers. One of the goals for this historic gathering and demonstration is to bring 125,000 paper cranes to Washington, D.C. JCYC is extremely pleased to be a partner in this effort and as an organization will do everything possible to speak out for those who are currently being targeted and scapegoated in this country. I believe the symbolism of the crane is more important than ever, and I encourage all of you to do everything you can to fold cranes and contribute to this effort. The organizers of the Washington, D.C. gathering are hoping to solicit 1,000 supporters to contribute $125 or more. To find out more about how you can support the National Pilgrimage to Close the Camps, go to https://tsuruforsolidarity.org or contact myself at josaki@jcyc.org. Sincerely, Jon Osaki To download a complete version of JCYC Up Close Winter 2020, click here.

A Message from the Executive Director

NAVIGATION
JCYC’S SOCIAL MEDIA
ADDRESS 2012 Pine Street San Francisco, CA 94115
CONTACT info@jcyc.org Tel:  (415) 202-7900 Fax: (415) 346-1948
JCYC Daycamp crane folding in the 1970’s
JCYC Staff folding cranes
JCYC Staff folding more cranes
NAVIGATION
JCYC’S SOCIAL MEDIA
ADDRESS 2012 Pine Street San Francisco, CA 94115
CONTACT info@jcyc.org Tel:  (415) 202-7900 Fax: (415) 346-1948

A Message from the

Executive Director

Excerpt from JCYC Up Close Winter 2020 Happy New Year! As some of you know, I am not only a long-time staff member of JCYC, but also participated in the organization’s programs as a child. I have many fond memories of my summers in JCYC’s Daycamp program. However, after all these years, one of the activities still stands out among the rest. It was during a summer at JCYC that I first learned the story of Sadako Sasaki. For those who do not know her story, Sadako was a child living in Hiroshima, Japan when the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the city in 1945. Though Sadako initially survived, she eventually developed leukemia from the radiation exposure. As her sickness grew worse, she learned of a Japanese legend, which promised that anyone who folds a thousand cranes (tsuru) will be granted happiness and good health. In the hopes that this legend would help her overcome the leukemia, Sadako began folding cranes. Though she was successful in folding over a thousand cranes, she eventually succumbed to her illness and passed away at the age of 12. Though this story did not have a happy ending, soon after Sadako’s death, her friends and family began raising money for a memorial. Today, a statue of Sadako stands on the top of the Children’s World Peace Monument in Hiroshima and remains one of the most enduring international symbols of peace and goodwill. Each summer when I was a kid in JCYC’s Daycamp program, we were told this story and would fold 1,000 paper cranes to remind ourselves of the importance of world peace. Today, the paper crane is once again being used to symbolize hope. In this instance, the tsuru is being used to demonstrate compassion, hope and healing to migrant children and families who are currently being incarcerated by the United States. This effort was started by a small band of activists, who call themselves Tsuru for Solidarity. Their initial plan was to collect paper cranes and bring them to the migrant detention center in Dilley, Texas. After putting out a call for 10,000 paper cranes, they ended up receiving over 25,000. They hung the cranes on the fences of the detention center in the hopes that the children being incarcerated would know that there are many who wish to express compassion for these innocent young souls. In June of 2020, Tsuru for Solidarity and advocacy groups from around the country will descend upon Washington, D.C. to protest the incarceration of migrant children and families and demand the closure of the detention centers. One of the goals for this historic gathering and demonstration is to bring 125,000 paper cranes to Washington, D.C. JCYC is extremely pleased to be a partner in this effort and as an organization will do everything possible to speak out for those who are currently being targeted and scapegoated in this country. I believe the symbolism of the crane is more important than ever, and I encourage all of you to do everything you can to fold cranes and contribute to this effort. The organizers of the Washington, D.C. gathering are hoping to solicit 1,000 supporters to contribute $125 or more. To find out more about how you can support the National Pilgrimage to Close the Camps, go to https://tsuruforsolidarity.org or contact myself at josaki@jcyc.org. Sincerely, Jon Osaki To download a complete version of JCYC Up Close Winter 2020, click here.
JCYC Daycamp crane folding in the 1970’s
JCYC Staff folding cranes
JCYC Staff folding more cranes