Excerpt from JCYC Up Close Summer 2019 Dear Friends, I feel compelled to share with you all a few thoughts about the tragic circumstances confronting migrant children in this country. I never imagined that I would see the day when our government would once again authorize the creation of American style concentration camps and yet that is exactly what is happening today. By now, most have seen the reports of “children as young as 7 and 8, many of them wearing clothes caked with snot and tears, caring for infants they’ve just met.” Visitors to the camps have witnessed, “toddlers without diapers relieving themselves in their pants and children are locked in their cells and cages nearly all day long.” In some facilities, the lights are left on all night and children shiver beneath aluminum blankets on concrete floors. This past June, Trump administration lawyers argued in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco that the government was not required to provide these children with basic hygienic items such as soap and toothbrushes. They even went so far as to argue that allowing incarcerated children to sleep is not specifically required under current law.  This is happening today in the United States of America. These horrors are not only going to continue, but our government is also making plans to imprison thousands more. As someone who also has worked on behalf of children my entire adult life, my heart aches right now. This is not my America and as child advocates we cannot and will not accept these horrific human rights violations. The Japanese American community understands what it means to be the unwanted immigrant. On June 27th, mobilizations were organized in Los Angeles, San Francisco, and San Jose’s Japantowns to speak out against the crimes against humanity currently being committed on United States soil. There was no organized opposition against the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II, and I am so pleased to see so many members of our community who refuse to remain silent while children and families are subjected to inhumane detention. I also had the pleasure of introducing some of our Nikkei Community Interns to the brave individuals who traveled all the way to Fort Sill Oklahoma to protest the use of the facility, which once imprisoned Native Americans in the 1800’s and Japanese Americans during World War II, to detain more migrant children. I doubt these college students will ever forget the time they spent with these courageous protestors and am hopeful they will bring that spirit back to their campuses. JCYC is committed to doing everything possible to address this horrific situation, including donating a portion of the proceeds from our SF Aloha Run to support organizations providing services to migrant children and families at the border. I am calling on each of you to marshal every resource and ounce of compassion you have to join us in speaking out and supporting these voiceless young souls. Sincerely, Jon Osaki Executive Director To download a complete version of JCYC Up Close Summer 2019, click here.

A Message from the Executive Director

NAVIGATION
JCYC’S SOCIAL MEDIA
ADDRESS 2012 Pine Street San Francisco, CA 94115
CONTACT info@jcyc.org Tel:  (415) 202-7900 Fax: (415) 346-1948
Jon with the NCI interns and the Tsuru For Solidarity protestors
NAVIGATION
JCYC’S SOCIAL MEDIA
ADDRESS 2012 Pine Street San Francisco, CA 94115
CONTACT info@jcyc.org Tel:  (415) 202-7900 Fax: (415) 921-1841

A Message from the

Executive Director

Excerpt from JCYC Up Close Summer 2019 Dear Friends, I feel compelled to share with you all a few thoughts about the tragic circumstances confronting migrant children in this country. I never imagined that I would see the day when our government would once again authorize the creation of American style concentration camps and yet that is exactly what is happening today. By now, most have seen the reports of “children as young as 7 and 8, many of them wearing clothes caked with snot and tears, caring for infants they’ve just met.” Visitors to the camps have witnessed, “toddlers without diapers relieving themselves in their pants and children are locked in their cells and cages nearly all day long.” In some facilities, the lights are left on all night and children shiver beneath aluminum blankets on concrete floors. This past June, Trump administration lawyers argued in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco that the government was not required to provide these children with basic hygienic items such as soap and toothbrushes. They even went so far as to argue that allowing incarcerated children to sleep is not specifically required under current law.  This is happening today in the United States of America. These horrors are not only going to continue, but our government is also making plans to imprison thousands more. As someone who also has worked on behalf of children my entire adult life, my heart aches right now. This is not my America and as child advocates we cannot and will not accept these horrific human rights violations. The Japanese American community understands what it means to be the unwanted immigrant. On June 27th, mobilizations were organized in Los Angeles, San Francisco, and San Jose’s Japantowns to speak out against the crimes against humanity currently being committed on United States soil. There was no organized opposition against the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II, and I am so pleased to see so many members of our community who refuse to remain silent while children and families are subjected to inhumane detention. I also had the pleasure of introducing some of our Nikkei Community Interns to the brave individuals who traveled all the way to Fort Sill Oklahoma to protest the use of the facility, which once imprisoned Native Americans in the 1800’s and Japanese Americans during World War II, to detain more migrant children. I doubt these college students will ever forget the time they spent with these courageous protestors and am hopeful they will bring that spirit back to their campuses. JCYC is committed to doing everything possible to address this horrific situation, including donating a portion of the proceeds from our SF Aloha Run to support organizations providing services to migrant children and families at the border. I am calling on each of you to marshal every resource and ounce of compassion you have to join us in speaking out and supporting these voiceless young souls.   Sincerely, Jon Osaki Executive Director To download a complete version of JCYC Up Close Summer 2019, click here.
Jon with the NCI interns and the Tsuru For Solidarity protestors